Eliot’s Function of Criticism, Brief Notes of T.S. Part 3 deals with Eliot’s criticism of Murr… Eliot’s Function of Criticism, Summary of Function of Criticism, Summary of T.S. Fortunately, in this earlier essay, Eliot makes it clear in logical rather than merely rhetorical terms why he believes that the sloppiness of thought and feeling associated with romanticism—that love affair with the Inner Voice—does not lend itself to criticism, and such clarity of intent continues to form a great part of the essay’s value as a critical document. He thought that poetry founded on amoral or indifferent beliefs was counterproductive and rebellious to life itself. Ironically enough, this same foundation, with its emphasis on the sacrosanct relationship between each soul and its creator, had also bred the profound respect for the individual as the court of last resort in matters of aesthetic, moral, ethical, and spritual judgments of which Eliot himself seemed to be more and more mistrustful the more his own creative and critical instincts and talents matured. Eliot, however, was never wont to compartmentalize the purely literary from other social and even political concerns, so the unwary reader of “The Function of Criticism” may quickly wonder what is going on. Literary criticism is an interpretive process used to weigh the social value of a written idea. In the same way, Eliot will gradually ally himself with belief systems and political ideologies that mitigate personal preferences for the sake of enduring foundational values. Applying criticism make our focus on certain aspect or element of literary work sharper than reading as usual. Eliot’s Function of Criticism, T. S. Eliot, T.S. Book reviews have the potential to determine whether or not a book will be sold in mass quantities. This abhorrence of his for the notion that the self is the final arbiter of all values and valid judgments eventually led him to embrace ultimate tradition in the Catholic Christian foundation of the Anglo-American culture that bred him. Literary criticism and interpretation give meaning and value to an author's work. The Function of CRITICISM Eliot’s Function of Criticism, Brief Notes of T.S. Part 3 deals with Eliot’s criticism of Murr… Eliot’s Function of Criticism, Summary of Function of Criticism, Summary of T.S. Fortunately, in this earlier essay, Eliot makes it clear in logical rather than merely rhetorical terms why he believes that the sloppiness of thought and feeling associated with romanticism—that love affair with the Inner Voice—does not lend itself to criticism, and such clarity of intent continues to form a great part of the essay’s value as a critical document. He thought that poetry founded on amoral or indifferent beliefs was counterproductive and rebellious to life itself. Ironically enough, this same foundation, with its emphasis on the sacrosanct relationship between each soul and its creator, had also bred the profound respect for the individual as the court of last resort in matters of aesthetic, moral, ethical, and spritual judgments of which Eliot himself seemed to be more and more mistrustful the more his own creative and critical instincts and talents matured. Eliot, however, was never wont to compartmentalize the purely literary from other social and even political concerns, so the unwary reader of “The Function of Criticism” may quickly wonder what is going on. Literary criticism is an interpretive process used to weigh the social value of a written idea. In the same way, Eliot will gradually ally himself with belief systems and political ideologies that mitigate personal preferences for the sake of enduring foundational values. Applying criticism make our focus on certain aspect or element of literary work sharper than reading as usual. Eliot’s Function of Criticism, T. S. Eliot, T.S. Book reviews have the potential to determine whether or not a book will be sold in mass quantities. This abhorrence of his for the notion that the self is the final arbiter of all values and valid judgments eventually led him to embrace ultimate tradition in the Catholic Christian foundation of the Anglo-American culture that bred him. Literary criticism and interpretation give meaning and value to an author's work. The Function of CRITICISM